Press Release: Invisible Men

 

The "Invisible Men" album represents a marked change for Anthony.  After "Sides", his last vocal album released in 1979, he returned to the instrumental field experimenting with synthesizers on "1984" and back to pure acoustic guitar with Berro Garcia on "Antiques".  During this period he amassed a great deal of songs in varied styles.

After "Sides" where he was vocally assisted by Dan Owen and Dale Newman, he was determined to handle most of the vocals himself, to record the basic tracks at home on 8-track and to keep the songs simple and concise.  Accordingly, he enlisted the services of Richard Scott, who assisted as engineer on "1984", a doctor of psychology as well as being lyricist and guitarist.  Together the two of them selected the material, giving preference to the more electronic, rhythmic aggressive element and rejecting the surfeit of lyrical, classical piano or 12-string based material which already appears abundantly on the "Private Parts And Pieces" albums.

The tracks were generally begun with (electronic) drumbox, as with "1984", programmed by Scott, then built up around synthesizer or guitar, Phillips adding bass and essential overdubs to complete the 8-track stage.  Twenty-five songs were recorded between April and June 1982 - these were reduced to 18 and then lyrics, and even tunes, had to be written in August and September.  Scott rose to the foreground during this period as Phillips found himself lyrically inundated, producing contrasting pieces such as the bizarre "Exocet" and plaintive "Falling For Love".

For the final phase, the scene changed from Phillips' home studio to the 24-track studio of Atmosphere in Central London.  Experienced producer Trevor Vallis was brought in to supervise the vocals and mixing.  Here, the tracks were refined and augmented by a host of musicians including drummers Jeff Dunne and Paul Robinson, percussionists Morris Pert and Joji Hirota, and a brass section arrange by Bimbo Acock..  Phillips, who had taken singing tuition from choir-master John Owen-Edwards, handled most of the vocals whilst Scott made an important contribution on "I Want Your Heart" and "Going For Broke".  Eighteen songs became thirteen and finally eleven, the casualties being the slower, more ballady songs.

The album was completed in December, and in February it was decided to create a band persona for this style, as distinct from the instrumental/classical side of Phillips' writing.  The actual constitution  of the band will remain a mystery but will always be based around the co-writing and co-production of Phillips, Scott and Vallis.


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